23 May
Combined Larval Guide

Combined Larval Guide

This publication combines for the first time the original Volume 1 on Dragonflies (2007) and Volume 2 on Damselflies (2009). Since the publication of these separate British Dragonfly Society (BDS) Field Guides, there has been increasing demand to combine them into a single book. In this volume, two new species, Dainty Damselfly Coenagrion scitulum and Southern Migrant Hawker Aeshna affinis, have been added. A new appendix for Willow Emerald Lestes viridis shows extra features on the exuvia and the scars left by ovipositing females. There have also been revisions to other text, but the overall format of this book matches the earlier field guides.

In many ways, dragonflies are appearing to do well at the moment. Being an essentially tropical group of insects, many species are apparently responding favourably to increasing temperatures and spreading northwards in their range. The recent colonisation of eastern England by Willow Emerald from the continent and the re-appearance in Britain of Dainty Damselfly after a gap of over fifty years could be just two examples of this. On the other hand, some species are in decline and suffering from range contractions.

In these times of rapid change, it is increasingly important for us to map species distribution and record important areas for dragonflies. It is particularly vital to know where species are breeding, so that these sites can be highlighted and protected. This book, with its concise text and superb photographs by Steve Cham, will enable anyone to find and identify breeding evidence with a little practice. For these reasons this new publication is an important resource for both professional ecologists and amateur enthusiasts alike.